Artificial Intelligence (AI)
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The notion of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is unfamiliar to the vast majority of people. For example, just 17 percent of 1,500 senior business leaders in the United States in 2017 stated that they were familiar with AI. They had no idea what it was or how it would impact their businesses. They knew that AI could transform business processes, but they were unsure how to use it inside their own companies. 

AI has the potential to significantly alter our lives, but many individuals are unfamiliar with it. People may use it to rethink how they integrate information, analyze data, and apply the resultant insights to make better decisions.

 Our goal is to explain AI to policymakers, opinion leaders, and interested observers and highlight how AI is already affecting the world and raising significant problems for society, the economy, and government through a thorough review of the topic.

This article covers new applications in finance and national security; health care; criminal justice; transportation and smart cities; data access difficulties; algorithmic bias; AI ethics; and legal culpability for AI choices. We compare and contrast the regulatory policies of the United States and the European Union and conclude by presenting some recommendations for maximizing AI’s potential while preserving human values.

To get the most out of artificial intelligence, we suggest the following steps:

  • AI research should be encouraged without compromising personal privacy
  • More government funding for unclassified AI research
  • New models of digital education and AI workforce development
  • The creation of a federal AI advisory committee to make policy recommendations
  • Engagement with state and local officials so they can implement effective policies
  • And the regulation of broad AI principles rather than specifics

Applicability across a wide range of industries is the second part of the study

Artificial intelligence (AI) isn’t some far-off concept; it’s already here and used in many fields. There are countless examples of how artificial intelligence is already having a huge influence on the world and improving human skills. Some examples include banking, national security, healthcare, and criminal justice. Smart cities are also included.

One of the reasons for AI’s rise in prominence is that it gives a wealth of prospects for economic growth. PWC calculated that “artificial intelligence technologies might enhance global GDP by $15.7 trillion, a full 14%, by 2030″ in their study. A government aiming to invest $150 billion in AI and make China the world’s AI leader by 2030 has spurred tremendous progress in China.

So far, $7 trillion has been invested in China, $3 trillion in North America, $1.8 trillion in Northern Europe, $1.2 trillion in Africa and Oceania, $0.9 trillion in the rest of Asia excluding China, $0.7 trillion in Southern Europe, and $0.5 trillion in Latin America.

According to a McKinsey Global Institute report, AI-led automation may boost China’s GDP by 0.8 to 1.4 percentage points per year.

Despite China lagging behind the US and UK in AI deployment, its enormous AI market offers considerable prospects for pilot testing and future growth for that country.

Defending the nation’s interests 

AI has a significant impact on national security. According to Project Maven, the US military uses artificial intelligence (AI) “to go through the vast amounts of data and video gathered by surveillance, then alert human analysts to trends.” “To meet our warfighters’ demands and to boost pace and agility of technology development and acquisition,” said Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan.

Because of AI’s ability to analyze enormous volumes of data in near real-time—if not in real-time—commanders and their staff will be able to do intelligence analysis and productivity previously unheard of. As human commanders outsource ordinary and in some cases, critical choices to AI platforms, the time associated with the decision and subsequent action will be substantially reduced.

When everything is said and done, war is a time-competitive process in which the side that can decide the fastest and move the most rapidly to execution will typically triumph. Indeed, artificially intelligent intelligence systems linked to AI-assisted command and control systems may expedite the process of decision support and decision making far more quickly than traditional ways of waging war can do.

If this procedure is linked with the automated deployment of artificially intelligent autonomous weapons systems capable of fatal effects, a new name has been proposed to describe war’s speed: hyper war.

Finance

As of 2014, the United States has invested $12.2 billion in artificial financial intelligence (FAI).

Loan decisions are increasingly being decided by algorithms that can consider a range of finely-parsed facts about a borrower, rather than merely a credit score and a background check.” “Robo-advisors” that “build tailored investment portfolios, eliminating the need for stockbrokers and financial advisors” are also available. Investment decisions may now be made in a matter of minutes thanks to these innovations, which are meant to remove emotions from the process.

As a case study, high-frequency trading on the stock markets has replaced much of the human decision-making process. With only a few clicks of the mouse, computers instantly match up people’s purchase and sell orders. Machines may detect trading inefficiencies. And market disparities at a very tiny scale, and they can then carry out deals that profit investors. Because of this concentration on “quantum bits,” which can store multiple values in one location, these instruments have a far larger capacity for storing information. As a result, storage capacity and processing time have significantly improved.

Health Care 

Computational complexity is being increased in health care with the use of artificial intelligence (AI). Deep learning may be used for medical difficulties, such as Merantix, a German business. With the help of Computer Tomography (CT) pictures, it may be used to discover lymph nodes in humans.

Nodes must be labeled, and potentially dangerous tumors or growths must be identified, according to the system’s designers. Radiologists, who charge $100 an hour, may only be able to read four photos each hour. It would take $250,000 to process 10,000 images, making it extremely expensive to accomplish by hand. 

In this case. Deep learning may be used to train computers on data sets to understand the difference. Between a normal-looking lymph node and an irregular-looking one. Radiology imaging professionals. May use this information on actual patients. To identify the extent to which someone is at risk of malignant lymph nodes. After practicing images and perfecting their labeling accuracy through imaging exercises. Identifying the healthy and sick nodes is the only way to tell which.

Transportation

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are having a significant impact on the transportation industry. Over $80 billion was spent on autonomous car technology. Between August 2014 and June 2017, according to research by Cameron Kerry and Jack Karsten of the Brookings Institution. As a result of these investments, the autonomous-driving sector will benefit.

Drone delivery systems, self-driving cars, and trucks are all examples of autonomous vehicles that use cutting-edge technology features. Features such as self-driving car systems. Collision avoidance using cameras and sensors. AI, high-performance computers and deep learning systems, and precise maps are some of those included in the system.

Smart Cities

Metropolitan governments are using AI to improve service delivery in urban areas. Kevin Desouza, Rashmi Krishnamurthy, and Gregory Dawson, for example, say:

Data analytics are being used by the Cincinnati Fire Department to better respond to medical emergencies. When a dispatcher receives a medical emergency call. An analytics system advises. The best course of action for the dispatcher. Based on a variety of parameters, including the patient’s kind of call, location, and weather, as well as previous calls.

Cincinnati officials use this technology to prioritize replies. And discover the most effective methods to respond to crises because they receive 80,000 calls each year. They view AI as a method to cope with massive quantities of data. And find effective ways to react to public requests. Authorities are aiming to be more proactive rather than reactive when it comes to providing urban services.

Another use for AI in financial systems is fraud detection. Fraudulent activity in large businesses can be challenging to detect. But artificial intelligence (AI) can spot anomalies, outliers, or unusual occurrences that require further study. In this way, managers can catch issues before they become harmful. 

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